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  USAAF Bell P-39L Airacobra Fighter - Hugh Dow, "Evelyn", 346th Fighter Squadron, 350th Fighter Group, Maison Blanche, Algeria, North Africa, 1943 (1:72 Scale)
USAAF Bell P-39L Airacobra Fighter - Hugh Dow, Evelyn, 346th Fighter Squadron, 350th Fighter Group, Maison Blanche, Algeria, North Africa, 1943

Hobby Master USAAF Bell P-39L Airacobra Fighter - Hugh Dow, 'Evelyn', 346th Fighter Squadron, 350th Fighter Group, Maison Blanche, Algeria, North Africa, 1943




 
List Price: $39.99
Our Price: $34.99 Sold Out!
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Stock Status: (Out of Stock)

Availability: Currently Unavailable
Product Code: HA1706

Description Extended Information
 
Hobby Master HA1706 USAAF Bell P-39L Airacobra Fighter - Hugh Dow, "Evelyn", 346th Fighter Squadron, 350th Fighter Group, Maison Blanche, Algeria, North Africa, 1943 (1:72 Scale) "Why should we have a navy at all? There are no enemies for it to fight except apparently the Army Air Force."
- General Carl Spaatz, Commander of the US 8th Army Air Force, after WWII

The P-39 was one of America's first-line pursuit planes in December 1941. It made its initial flight in April 1939 at Wright Field and by the time of the Pearl Harbor attack, nearly 600 had been built. Its unique engine location behind the cockpit caused some pilot concern, but this proved to be no more of a hazard in a crash landing than with an engine located forward of the cockpit. However, the P-39's spin characteristics could be quite a problem if recovery techniques were ignored.

The Airacobra saw combat throughout the world, particularly in the Southwest Pacific, Mediterranean and Russian theaters. Because its engine was not equipped with a supercharger, the P-39 performed best below 17,000 feet altitude, and it often was used at lower altitudes for such missions as ground strafing. When P-39 production ended in August 1944, Bell had built 9,584 Airacobras, of which 4,773 had been allotted to the Soviet Union. Russian pilots, in particular, liked the cannon-armed P-39 for its ground attack capability. Other P-39s served with French and British forces.

This particular 1:72 scale replica of a USAAF Bell P-39L Airacobra fighter was piloted by Hugh Dow. The aircraft was nicknamed "Evelyn", and attached to the 346th Fighter Squadron, 350th Fighter Group, then deployed to Maison Blanche, Algeria, North Africa, during 1943. Sold Out!

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 5-3/4 inches
Length: 5 inches

Release Date: November 2008

Historical Account: "Upgunned but Underperforming" - In September 1940, Britain ordered 386 P-39Ds (known as the Model 14), of 675 in all, which differed in that the 37 mm was replaced with a 20 mm Hispano and the 6x0.3 by a .303 (7.7 mm). These began equipping 601 Squadron in September 1941, and were promptly recognized as having an inadequate rate of climb and performance at altitude. Only 80 joined the RAF (only 601 Squadron outfitted with the P-39). Over 250 were transferred to the Red Air Force, about 200 were repossessed by the US Army after Pearl Harbor, and some 200 sent to the Eighth Air Force in 1942 (the Army models being designated P-400).

Features
  • Ability to display the model with landing gear in either extended or retracted mode
  • Realistic paint scheme with authentic insignia
  • Display stand

Average Customer Review: 5 of 5 | Total Reviews: 1 Write a review.


  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
USAAF Bell P-39L Airacobra Fighter October 19, 2011
Reviewer: Daniel Scott from Fort Worth, TX United States  
Great model!

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