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  US Army Air Corps Douglas A-24 Banshee Dive Bomber - 91st Bombardment Squadron, Java, 1942 (1:72 Scale)
US Army Air Corps Douglas A-24 Banshee Dive Bomber - 91st Bombardment Squadron, Java, 1942

Hobby Master US Army Air Corps Douglas A-24 Banshee Dive Bomber - 91st Bombardment Squadron, Java, 1942




 
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Product Code: HA0164

Description Technical Specs Extended Information
 
Hobby Master HA0164 US Army Air Corps Douglas A-24 Banshee Dive Bomber - 91st Bombardment Squadron, Java, 1942 (1:72 Scale) "Why should we have a navy at all? There are no enemies for it to fight except apparently the Army Air Force."
- General Carl Spaatz, Commander of the US 8th Army Air Force, after WWII

The Dauntless was the standard shipborne dive-bomber of the US Navy from mid-1940 until November 1943, when the first Curtiss Helldivers arrived to replace it. Between 1942-43, the Dauntless was pressed into service again and again, seeing action in the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Guadalcanal campaign. It was, however, at the Battle of Midway, that the Dauntless came into its own, singlehandedly destroying four of the Imperial Japanese Navy's frontline carriers. The SBD (referred to, rather affectionaly by her aircrews, as "Slow But Deadly") was gradually phased out during 1944. The June 20th, 1944 strike against the Japanese Mobile Fleet, known as the Battle of the Philippine Sea, was the last major engagement in which it was used. From 1942 to 1944, the SBD was also used by several land-based Marine Corps squadrons.

Built as a two-seat, low-wing Navy scout bomber, the Dauntless was powered by a single Wright R1820 1200-horsepower engine. It became the mainstay of the Navy's air fleet in the Pacific, suffering the lowest loss ratio of any U.S. carrier-borne aircraft. A total of 5,936 SBDs were delivered to the Navy and Marine Corps between 1940 and the end of its production, in July 1944.

The U.S. Army had its own version of the SBD, known as the A-24 Banshee, which lacked the tail hook used for carrier landings, and a pneumatic tire replaced the solid tail wheel. First assigned to the 27th Bombardment Group (Light) at Hunter Field, Ga., A-24s participated in the Louisiana maneuvers during September 1941. There were three versions of the Banshee (A-24, the A-24A and A-24B) used by the Army in the early stages of the war. The USAAF used 948 of the 5,937 Dauntlesses built.

This particular 1:72 scale replica of a US Army Air Corps Douglas A-24 Banshee dive bomber was deployed to Java during 1942. Sold Out!

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 6.5 inches
Length: 5 inches

Release Date: December 2009

Historical Account: "East of Java" - The U.S. Army sent 52 A-24 Banshees in crates to the Philippine Islands in the fall of 1941 to equip the 27th Bombardment Group, whose personnel arrived separately. However with the attack of Pearl Harbor, these aircraft were diverted to Australia and the 27th BG fought on Bataan as infantry. While in Australia, these aircraft were reassembled for flight to the Philippines, but missing parts including solenoids, trigger motors, and gun mounts delayed shipment. Plagued with mechanical problems the A-24s were diverted to the 91st Bombardment Squadron and designated for assignment to Java instead. On February 17th, 1942, only seven of the original 52 A-24s were combat ready. The A-24s had worn-out engines, no armor plating, and no self sealing fuel tanks. Referring to themselves as "Blue Rock Clay Pigeons", the 91st attacked the enemy harbor and airbase at Bali and damaged or sunk numerous ships around Java. After the Japanese shot down two A-24s and damaged three so badly they could no longer fly, the 91st received orders to evacuate Java in early March, ending a brief but valiant effort.

The Banshees left in Australia were assigned to the 8th Bombardment Squadron, 3rd Bombardment Group, to defend New Guinea. On July 26th, 1942, seven A-24s attacked a convoy off Buna, but only one survived: the Japanese shot down five of them and damaged the sixth so badly that it did not make it back to base. Regarded by many pilots as too slow, too short-ranged and too poorly armed, the remaining A-24s were relegated to non-combat missions. In the United States, the A-24s became training aircraft or towed targets for aerial gunnery training. The more powerful A-24B was later used against the Japanese forces in the Gilbert Islands.

Features
  • Diecast construction
  • Spinning propeller
  • Accurate markings and insignia
  • Comes with display stand


Average Customer Review: 5 of 5 | Total Reviews: 1 Write a review.

  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
US Army Air Corps Douglas A-24 Banshee Dive Bomber October 19, 2011
Reviewer: Daniel Scott from Fort Worth, TX United States  
Very good quality, and detail. Stand allows bomb load to be installed with wheels up configuration.

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