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  US Navy Chance-Vought F4U-5N Corsair Radar-Equipped Night Fighter - VMF(N)-513, K8, Kunson, Korea, 1952 (1:48 Scale)
US Navy Chance-Vought F4U-5N Corsair Radar-Equipped Night Fighter - VMF(N)-513, K8, Kunson, Korea, 1952

Armour Collection US Navy Chance-Vought F4U-5N Corsair Radar-Equipped Night Fighter - VMF(N)-513, K8, Kunson, Korea, 1952




 
List Price: $80.00
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Stock Status: (Out of Stock)

Availability: Currently Unavailable
Product Code: B11E752

Description Extended Information
 
Armour Collection B11E752 US Navy Chance-Vought F4U-5N Corsair Radar-Equipped Night Fighter - VMF(N)-513, K8, Kunson, Korea, 1952 (1:48 Scale) "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."
- British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, commenting on the British airmen in the Battle of Britain

Its gull-wing shape made it instantly recognizable. Its characteristic sound while in an attack dive led the Japanese to call it "The Whistling Death." Combined with its high speed, agility and toughness, the Vought F4U Corsair was one of the finest fighters ever built. Originally thought to be too powerful to fly from a carrier, the Corsair weaved a path of destruction in battle after battle during WWII, totally outclassing the much-feared Zero. The last of the great piston-engine fighters, the Corsair went on to become an important component of the US naval air power during the Korean War. Even while it was being replaced by jet aircraft, pilots flying this tough warbird were credited with downing a few MiG-15 jet fighters.

This particular 1:48 scale replica of a US Navy Chance-Vought F4U-5N Corsair radar-equipped night fighter was attached to VMF(N)-513, K8, then deployed to Kunson, South Korea, in 1952. Sold Out!

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 10 inches
Length: 8.25 inches

Release Date: February 2008

Historical Account: "Night Fighters" - Between World War II and the Korean War, VMF-513 operated from Marine Corps Air Station El Toro, California. Transitioning to the F4U-5N, the squadron was re-designated VMF(N)-513 ("Night Fighters"). In August 1950, the squadron deployed to Japan under operational control of the U.S. 5th Air Force.

During the summer of 1952, VMF(N)-513 received the F3D Skyknight, the squadron's first jet aircraft. On the early morning of November 3, 1952, VMF(N)-513 made aviation history with the first radar kill on an enemy jet aircraft at night, when Maj. William T. Stratton Jr., and MSgt Hans Hoglind shot down a North Korean Yak-15. The squadron was credited with 10 confirmed night kills during the Korean Conflict.

Following the war, the squadron operated out of NAS Atsugi, Japan. On July 26th, 1958, VMF-513 received the F4D Skyray aircraft. In October 1962, VMF(AW)-513 was relocated from NAS Atsugi Japan to MCAS El Toro, California. The outfit was effectively disbanded in Japan and reformed in El Toro under a new CO, who organized new pilots and maintenance Marines to operate the now "old" F-4D Skyrays while the Flying Nightmares awaited delivery of the brand new F-4 Phantom II. This occurred in early 1963 and most of the Nightmare pilots did their transition training at nearby NAS Miramar, at the Navy's replacement squadron.

Features
  • Diecast construction
  • Fixed lowered landing gear
  • Plexiglass canopy
  • Accurate markings and insignia

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