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  Russian ZIS-6/BM-13 Katyusha Mobile Rocket Launcher - Guards Mortar Regiment, Kursk, Russia, 1943 (1:43 Scale)
Russian ZIS-6/BM-13 Katyusha Mobile Rocket Launcher - Guards Mortar Regiment, Kursk, Russia, 1943

Eaglemoss Russian ZIS-6/BM-13 Katyusha Mobile Rocket Launcher - Guards Mortar Regiment, Kursk, Russia, 1943




 
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Eaglemoss EM019 Russian ZIS-6/BM-13 Katyusha Mobile Rocket Launcher - Guards Mortar Regiment, Kursk, Russia, 1943 (1:43 Scale)

"By powerful artillery fire, air strikes, and a wave of attacking tanks, we're supposed to swiftly crush the enemy."
- Marshal Georgi K. Zhukov

Katyusha multiple rocket launchers are a type of rocket artillery first built and fielded by the Soviet Union in World War II. Multiple rocket launchers such as these deliver a devastating amount of explosives to a target area more quickly than conventional artillery, but with lower accuracy and requiring a longer time to reload. They are fragile compared to artillery guns, but are inexpensive and easy to produce. Katyushas of World War II, the first self-propelled artillery mass-produced by the Soviet Union, were usually mounted on trucks. This mobility gave the Katyusha (and other self-propelled artillery) another advantage: being able to deliver a large blow all at once, and then move before being located and attacked with counter-battery fire.

Katyusha weapons of World War II included the BM-13 launcher, light BM-8, and heavy BM-31. Today, the nickname is also applied to newer truck-mounted Soviet (and not only Soviet) multiple rocket launchers - notably the common BM-21 and derivatives.

Pictured here is a 1:43 scale Russian ZIS-6/BM-13 Katyusha Mobile Rocket Launcher that was attached to a Guards Mortar Regiment, then deployed to Kursk, Russia, during 1943. Now in stock!

Dimensions:
Length: 4 inches
Width: 2 inches

Release Date: October 2014

Historical Account: "Stalin's Organ" - Initially, concerns for secrecy kept their military designation from being known by the soldiers who operated them. They were called by code names such as Kostikov guns (after the head of the RNII, the Reaction-Engine Scientific Research Institute), and finally classed as Guards Mortars. The name BM-13 was only allowed into secret documents in 1942, and remained classified until after the war.

Because they were marked with the letter K (for Voronezh Komintern Factory), Red Army troops adopted a nickname from Mikhail Isakovsky's popular wartime song, "Katyusha", about a girl longing for her absent beloved, who has gone away on military service. Katyusha is the Russian equivalent of Katie, an endearing diminutive form of the name Katherine: Yekaterina, Katya, Katyusha.

German troops coined the nickname Stalin's organ (German: Stalinorgel), after Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, prompted by the visual resemblance of the launch array to a church organ and the sound of the weapon's rocket motors. Weapons of this type are known by the same name in Denmark (Danish: Stalinorgel), Finland (Finnish: Stalinin urut), France (French: orgue de Staline), Norway (Norwegian: Stalinorgel), the Netherlands and Belgium (Dutch: Stalinorgel), Hungary (Hungarian: Sztalinorgona), and in Sweden (Swedish: Stalinorgel).

The heavy BM-31 launcher was also referred to as Andryusha (Андрюша, an affectionate diminutive of "Andrew").

Features
  • Diecast metal construction
  • Rolling wheels
  • Accurate markings and insignia
  • Comes with display case

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