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  RAF BAC TSR-2 Tactical Strike Aircraft - XR222, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire (1:72 Scale)
RAF BAC TSR-2 Tactical Strike Aircraft - XR222, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire

Corgi RAF BAC TSR-2 Tactical Strike Aircraft - XR222, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire




 
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Product Code: AA38602

Description Extended Information
 
Corgi AA38602 RAF BAC TSR-2 Tactical Strike Aircraft - XR222, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire (1:72 Scale) "All modern aircraft have four dimensions: span, length, height and politics. TSR-2 simply got the first three right."
- Sir Sydney Camm, an English aeronautical engineer who contributed to many Hawker aircraft designs

The British Aircraft Corporation Tactical Strike/Reconnaissance 2 (TSR-2) was an ill-fated Cold War strike aircraft developed by the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC) for the Royal Air Force (RAF) in the early 1960s. The TSR-2 was designed to penetrate a well-defended forward battle area at low altitudes and very high speeds, and then attack high-value targets in the rear with close-in bomb runs and precision drops. The TSR-2 included a number of advanced features that made it the highest performing aircraft in this role, yet the programme was controversially cancelled in favor of the General Dynamics F-111, a procurement that itself was later cancelled.

The envisioned "standard mission" for the TSR-2 was to carry a 2,000 lb (900 kg) weapon internally for a combat radius of 1,000 nautical miles (nm) (1,850 km). Of that mission 100 nm (185 km) was to be flown at higher altitudes at Mach 1.7 and the 200 nm (370 km) into and out of the target area was to be flown as low as 200 feet (60 m) at Mach 0.95. The rest of the mission was to be flown at Mach 0.92. If the entire mission were to be flown at the low 200-ft altitude, the mission radius was reduced to 700 nm (1,300 km). Heavier weapons loads could be carried with further reductions in range.

Pictured here is a 1:72 scale replica of a RAF British Aerospace Corporation TSR-2 strike aircraft that is currently on display at the Imperial War Museum, located at Duxford, Cambridgeshire, England. Sold Out!

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 6.25-inches
Length: 14.75 inches

Release Date: March 2011

Historical Account: "Museum Quality" - The TSR-2 included a number of advanced features that made it the highest performing aircraft of this type in the world. The prototype TSR-2, XR219 flew from Boscombe Down on September 27th, 1964, and the test program soon made good progress despite some initial problems. However, a Labour Government had taken office shortly after the TSR-2's first flight and the writing was on the wall. XR219 was the only example to fly, the project being cancelled controversially in favor of the General Dynamics F111, a procurement that was itself later cancelled.

Thankfully the ordered destruction of all five TSR-2 prototypes did not happen. XR219, along with XR221 and XR223 were lost, having been taken to Shoeburyness range in Essex and used for target practice. The other two prototypes were rescued and XR220 was placed on display at RAF Cosford's Aerospace Museum, whilst XR222 was initially sent to the College of Aeronautics at Cranfield and is now on display at the Imperial War Museum at Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

Features
  • Diecast construction
  • Opening canopy
  • Ability to display the model in landed or in-flight mode
  • Comes with display stand

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