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  Japanese Nakajima Ki-43-II Hayabusa "Oscar" Fighter - Akira Sugimoto, 2 Chutai/54 Sentai, Hokkaido Island, 1943 (1:72 Scale)
Japanese Nakajima Ki-43-II Hayabusa Oscar Fighter - Akira Sugimoto, 2 Chutai/54 Sentai, Hokkaido Island, 1943

IXO Models Japanese Nakajima Ki-43-II Hayabusa Oscar Fighter - Akira Sugimoto, 2 Chutai/54 Sentai, Hokkaido Island, 1943




 
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Product Code: IXJ200605

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IXO Models IXJ200605 Japanese Nakajima Ki-43-II Hayabusa "Oscar" Fighter - Akira Sugimoto, 2 Chutai/54 Sentai, Hokkaido Island, 1943 (1:72 Scale) "We have resolved to endure the unendurable and suffer what is insufferable."
- Japanese Emperor Hirohito speaking to the Japanese people after the atomic bombings, August 1945

The Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Peregrine Falcon) was numerically the most important fighter used by the Japanese Army Air Force during the Pacific War. It remained in production from the beginning of the Pacific War until its end in August 1945. In many ways, it was a transitional type, bridging the gap between the lightly-loaded monoplane fighters of the late 1930s with their fixed undercarriages and open cockpits, and the more highly-powered heavy fighters of the early 1940s with their retractable undercarriages and enclosed cockpits.

Its appearance was a complete surprise to the Allies, and the fighter proved to be superior in performance to most of its opponents during the first year of the Pacific War. Most of the Japanese Army's aces established the larger part of their scores while flying this airplane. The Ki-43 is often confused with its contemporary, the famed Mitsubishi A6M Reisen (Zero Fighter) of the Japanese Navy, and was often misidentified as a "Zero" early in the war. Sold Out!

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 5.25 inches
Length: 5 inches

Release Date: August 2005

Historical Account: "The Final Mission" - On January 7th, 1945, US Army Air Force ace Tommy McGuire led a flight of four planes on an early morning fighter sweep over the Japanese airdrome on Negros Island. Flying McGuire's wing was Capt. Edwin Weaver, whom McGuire had given demerits to when they were cadets in San Antonio. Major Jack Rittmayer and Lt. Douglas Thropp formed the second element. All were veteran combat pilots. The P-38's each carried two 160 gallon external fuel tanks. They spotted a single Jap fighter coming right at them.

They departed Marsten Strip around 0615 and leveled off at 10,000 feet, but in the vicinity of Negros the weather forced their descent to 6,000 feet. McGuire led Daddy Flight to an airdrome over Fabrica Strip and made a futile attempt at provoking an enemy response by circling the area for approximately ten minutes. They were now flying at 1,700 feet.

When this effort failed, McGuire proceeded to another airdrome on the western coast of the island. En route, Rittmayer throttled back while breaking through the clouds and became temporarily separated from the rest of the flight. McGuire ordered his pilots to regroup, but learned that Rittmayer's aircraft encountered engine trouble. Thropp, therefore, moved into the number-three position.

Suddenly, Weaver spotted a Japanese fighter heading in their direction, 500 feet below and 1,000 yards ahead. The Ki-43 Oscar, piloted by Warrant Officer Akira Sugimoto, passed below McGuire's P-38 before either pilot could react. Meanwhile, Sergeant Mixunori Fukuda, piloting a Ki-84 Frank, was attempting to land and noticed his comrade's plight. Sugimoto fired into Thropp's aircraft, destroying one of the turbo-chargers. The Lieutenant's first thought was to drop his belly tank, but McGuire anticipated his intention and ordered his pilots to refrain from doing this. It is assumed he issued this order to avoid an early return to Leyte, thereby scrubbing the mission.

Rittmayer, meanwhile, had rejoined the flight and maneuvered his malfunctioning fighter to an advantageous position. He fired into Sugimoto's Oscar, frightening the Warrant Officer off Thropp's tail, but the enemy pilot didn't flee as anticipated. Instead, he turned his fighter tightly and fired several long bursts into Weaver's P-38. Weaver summoned McGuire's assistance.

McGuire's response was immediate as he turned sharply to the left, but something went wrong as his Lightning shuddered and threatened to stall. He sharply increased his turn in an attempt to get a shot at the enemy fighter, but his plane lost momentum and snap-rolled to the left. It was last seen in an inverted position with the nose down about 30-degrees.

Weaver momentarily lost sight of McGuire's fighter, but a second later witnessed an explosion. Sugimoto broke off his attack against Weaver just before McGuire's plane crashed. Rittmayer and Thropp pursued the damaged Oscar as it climbed to the north, and the young Lieutenant managed to deliver one last burst into Sugimoto's aircraft before it crash-landed in the jungle. He died shortly thereafter from six bullet wounds to the chest. (courtesy Acepilots.com)

Features
  • Ability to display the model with landing gear in either extended or retracted mode
  • Realistic paint scheme with authentic insignia
  • Display stand

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World War II: War in the Pacific > Blunting the Sword (Jan 1943 - Dec 1943)