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  US Navy Iowa Class Battleship - USS Missouri (BB-63), Tokyo Bay, 1945 (1:700 Scale)
US Navy Iowa Class Battleship - USS Missouri (BB-63), Tokyo Bay, 1945

Gearbox Toys US Navy Iowa Class Battleship - USS Missouri (BB-63), Tokyo Bay, 1945




 
List Price: $34.99
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Product Code: GBX9007

Description Extended Information
 
Gearbox GBX9007 US Navy Iowa Class Battleship - USS Missouri (BB-63), Tokyo Bay, 1945 (1:700 Scale) "Damn the torpedoes. Full speed ahead!"
- Admiral Farragut sailing aboard his flagship Hartford while entering Mobile Bay, Alabama, August 23, 1864

The Iowa-class battleships were four battleships constructed by the United States Navy in the 1940s for use as escorts for the Fast Carrier Task Forces operating in the Pacific Theatre of World War II. They comprised the final class of U.S. battleships and included USS Iowa (BB-60), USS New Jersey (BB-62), USS Missouri (BB-63), and USS Wisconsin (BB-64). They were completed in the early to mid-1940s; two more were laid down but were canceled prior to completion and ultimately scrapped.

Built with cost as no object, the Iowa class was arguably the ultimate in the evolution of the capital ship. The Iowa class was ranked first in the Discovery Channel's list of 10 ships that shaped naval warfare. Yet even as these behemoths entered service, they were being eclipsed by aircraft carriers as the most important naval vessels.

Pictured here is a 1:700 scale diecast replica of the US battleship Missouri. Comes on a special display plinth. Sold Out!

Dimensions:
Length: 12 inches
Width: 2 inches

Release Date: May 2006

Historical Account: "Big Mo" - Missouri arrived at Ulithi on May 9th, 1945, and thence proceeded to Apra Harbor, Guam, on the 18th. That afternoon Admiral William F. Halsey, Jr., Commander 3d Fleet, broke his flag in Missouri. She passed out of the harbor on the 21st, and by the 27th was again conducting shore bombardment against Japanese positions on Okinawa. Missouri now led the 3rd Fleet in strikes on airfields and installations on Kyushu from June 2nd-3rd. She rode out a fierce storm on the 5th and 6th that wrenched off the bow of the cruiser Pittsburgh. Some topside fittings were smashed, but Missouri suffered no major damage. Her fleet again struck Kyushu on the 8th, then hit hard in a coordinated air-surface bombardment before retiring towards Leyte. She arrived San Pedro, Leyte, on the 13th, after almost three months of continuous operations in support of the Okinawa campaign.

Here she prepared to lead the 3rd Fleet in strikes at the heart of Japan from within its home waters. The mighty fleet set a northerly course on July 8th to approach the Japanese mainland. Raids took Tokyo by surprise on the 10th, followed by more devastation at the juncture of Honshu and Hokkaido on the 13th and 14th. For the first time a naval gunfire force wrought destruction on a major installation within the home islands, when Missouri closed the shore to join in a bombardment on the 15th that rained destruction on the Nihon Steel Co. and the Wanishi Ironworks at Muroran, Hokkaido.

During the night of the 17th, Missouri bombarded industrial targets in the Hichiti area, Honshu. Inland Sea aerial strikes continued through the 25th, and Missouri guarded the carriers as they struck hard blows at the Japanese capital. As July ended the Japanese no longer had any home waters. Missouri had led her fleet to gain control of the air and sea approaches to the very shores of Japan.

Strikes on Hokkaido and northern Honshu resumed on August 9th, 1945, the day the second atomic bomb was dropped. Next day, at 20:54, Missouri's men were electrified by the unofficial news that Japan was ready to surrender, provided that the Emperor's prerogatives as a sovereign ruler were not compromised. Not until 07:45 on August 15th, was word received that President Truman had announced Japan's acceptance of unconditional surrender.

Features
  • Diecast metal and plastic construction
  • Comes on a display plinth
  • Full draught model of a fighting ship
  • Superb attention to detail

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