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  German Junkers Ju-87B Stuka Dive-Bomber - Stab III./Sturzkampfgeschwader 77, Caen, France, 1940 (1:72 Scale)
German Junkers Ju-87B Stuka Dive-Bomber - Stab III./Sturzkampfgeschwader 77, Caen, France, 1940

Oxford Diecast German Junkers Ju-87B Stuka Dive-Bomber - Stab III./Sturzkampfgeschwader 77, Caen, France, 1940




 
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Stock Status: In Stock

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Oxford AC004 German Junkers Ju-87B Stuka Dive-Bomber - Stab III./Sturzkampfgeschwader 77, Caen, France, 1940 (1:72 Scale) "Guns before butter. Guns will make us powerful; butter will only make us fat."
- Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering, Head of the German Luftwaffe

During the early to mid-stages of the Second World War, the Stuka (short for "sturzkampfflugzeug" or dive-bomber) struck terror in the hearts and minds of soldiers and civilians alike. The Stuka was a rugged machine, designed to swoop down and destroy its target using 500-lb bombs or tear into them using 37mm flak guns mounted underneath the wings.

Pictured here is a 1:72 scale replica of a German Junkers Ju-87B Stuka dive-bomber that was attached to Stab III./St.G.77, then deployed to Caen, France, during 1940. Now in stock!

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 7.5 inches
Length: 7 inches

Release Date: June 2011

Historical Account: "Death from Above" - Flying at 4,600 meters (15,000 ft), the pilot of a Stuka located his target through a bombsight window in the cockpit floor. After opening the dive brakes and slowing his throttle, he then rolled the aircraft 180, automatically nosing the aircraft into a dive. Red tabs protruded from the upper surfaces of the wing as a visual indicator to the pilot that in case of a g induced black-out, the automatic dive recovery system would be activated.

The Stuka dived at a 60 - 90 degree angle, accelerating to 600 km/h (350 mph). When the aircraft was reasonably close to the target, a light on the contact altimeter came on to indicate the bomb-release point, usually at a minimum height of 450 m (1,500 ft). The pilot released the bomb by depressing a knob on the control column to release weapons and to initiate the automatic pull-out mechanism. A clutch located under the fuselage would swing the bomb out of the way of the propeller, and the aircraft would automatically begin a 6g pullout.

Once the nose was above the horizon, dive brakes were retracted, the throttle was opened, and the propeller was set to climb. The pilot regained control and resumed normal flight. The remaining bombs under the wings were used for other targets.

Features
  • Diecast metal construction
  • Landing gear in a gear up configuration
  • Plexiglass canopy
  • Spinning propeller
  • Accurate markings and insignia
  • Comes with display stand

Accessories for this product...
The Swoop of Death
Sale Price: $9.99

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The Swoop of Death: The Development and Operational History of German Dive-Bombers (DVD)

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