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  German Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8 'Anton' Fighter - Uffz. Paul Lixfeld, 6./II JG 300, Lubnitz, Germany, November 1944 (1:72 Scale)
German Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8 Anton Fighter - Uffz. Paul Lixfeld, 6./II JG 300, Lubnitz, Germany, November 1944

IXO Models German Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8 'Anton' Fighter - Uffz. Paul Lixfeld, 6./II JG 300, Lubnitz, Germany, November 1944




 
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List Price: $29.99
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Product Code: IXJ200606

Description Extended Information
 
IXO Models IXJ200606 German Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8 'Anton' Fighter - Uffz. Paul Lixfeld, 6./II JG 300, Lubnitz, Germany, November 1944 (1:72 Scale) "Guns before butter. Guns will make us powerful; butter will only make us fat."
- Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering, Head of the German Luftwaffe

Nicknamed the "Butcher Bird," the Fw 190 was Germany's best air-to-ground fighter. Faster and more agile than the British Spitfire, it dominated the skies over Europe as a fighter and was the Luftwaffe's most important ground-attack aircraft. Controlled by the skilled hands of aces like Oberleutnant Otto Kittel, the Fw 190 gained the reputation of being one of the greatest fighters of all time. This fighter-bomber and anti-tank aircraft was almost impossible to defeat until the introduction of the long-range P-51 Mustang.

Pictured here is a 1:72 scale replica of a German Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8 'Anton' fighter that was piloted by Uffz. Paul Lixfeld, who was attached to the 6./II JG 300, then deployed to Lubnitz, Germany, during November 1944. Sold Out!

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 5.25 inches
Length: 5 inches

Release Date: September 2006

Historical Account: "Wild Boars" - To combat the widespread use of Window (chaff designed to confuse German radar sets) it was decided to light up the skies as brightly as possible during an air raid. Along with the fires started from bombing this tactic provided enough illumination to allow single-engine day fighters to attack enemy bombers, a tactic that would be come known as Wilde Sau (Wild Boar). Above a pre-arranged flak free altitude usually 15,000ft (4570m) these fighters would patrol, waiting to pounce on bombers now clearly silhouetted. Major Hans-Joachim "Hajo" Herrmann, a veteran of 300 bombing missions against England and Malta, initiated the Wilde Sau idea. In addition to the above tactics Wilde Sau were given a large degree of freedom in seeking out and attacking enemy aircraft. Encouraged to use their own judgement and take the initiative even to the point of disregarding orders the Wilde Sau were freelancers in the night war. At first "Hajo" Herrmann formed a Kommando of twelve Fw 190A-4 fighters with 66 gallon drop tanks to increase their endurance. On July 3rd, the Kommado group shot down 12 RAF bombers over Cologne.

On the night of August 17th, 1943 when the RAF bombed the secret research facilities on the island of Peenemünde there were 55 Wilde Sau among the 200 plus night fighters defending the Reich. In an effort to confuse the Germans eight Mosquito bombers flew in over Berlin dropping targeting flares, which usually preceded a major attack by heavy bombers. Many night fighters were directed to the capital and circled in vain for hours but 30 or so of the Wilde Sau pilots managed to intercept the final wave of bombers over Peenemünde, bringing down 29 of the 40 bombers the British lost in the raid.

Less than a week later, on the night of August 23rd, the Wilde Sau concept was fully realized in the skies over Berlin. Nearly an hour prior, 727 British bombers reached the capital every available fighter was already en route to defend Berlin. On the ground searchlights lit up the sky brilliantly and gun batteries had been issued incandescent rockets to launch, providing even more illumination. Between the flak guns and night fighters 56 of the attacking bombers were shot down. Twice more during the following two weeks the RAF would return to bomb Berlin losing 67 aircraft in the process.

Goring was so pleased he promoted "Hajo" Herrmann to lieutenant colonel and instructed him to triple the strength of the Wilde Sau units.

Features
  • Diecast metal construction
  • Ability to display the model with landing gear in either extended or retracted mode
  • Realistic paint scheme with authentic insignia
  • Display stand

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World War II: War on the Western Front > Unleash the Fighters (September 1940 - May 1945)