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Gaso.Line US Military Vehicles

Gaso.Line US Military Vehicles


Gaso.Line has developed an extensive line of diecast and resin military vehicles that, in many instances, marries a chassis from the Solido/Verem line with specially designed resin parts produced by Gaso.Line. All of the vehicles you see here are produced in limited runs, sometimes numbering only a few dozen pieces, making them valuable additions to any military enthusiast's collection. These vehicles are built and imported directly from France, making them hard to come by in the North American marketplace.
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US M3A1 Half-Track with Three Soldiers - Summer Camouflage French M10 Wolverine Tank Destroyer with Three Crewmen US 155mm Field Gun M2
US M3A1 Half-Track with Three Soldiers - Summer Camouflage (1:50 Scale)
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French M10 Wolverine Tank Destroyer with Three Crewmen (1:50 Scale)
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US 155mm Field Gun M2 (1:50 Scale)
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The best known American halftracks were the M series made as a standardized design by Autocar, Diamond T, International and White. The M series had a similar front end to the White M3A1 Scout Car but used more powerful engines: a 147bhp 6.3-liter White AX in the Autocar, Diamond T, and White, and a 143bhp 1HC in the International. The US M10 tank destroyer was designed for use against armored vehicles, combining heavy firepower, excellent mobility and sloping armor with good ballistic qualities. The M10 boasted a 3-inch gun mounted within a semi-open turret on amedium tank chassis. The US Army adopted a 155mm gun from the French in 1917. They liked the caliber and in the 1930s developed a modern version, producing one of the finest guns of the war years. The 155mm M2, which inevitably became known as 'Long Tom' was on a split trail carriage with eight wheels under the gun and a two-wheel limber for towing.
US 57mm M1 Anti-Tank Gun US M33 Artillery Tractor US M4A3 Sherman Medium Tank With Soft Armor - Pacific Camouflage
US 57mm M1 Anti-Tank Gun (1:50 Scale)
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US M33 Artillery Tractor (1:50 Scale)
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US M4A3 Sherman Medium Tank With Soft Armor - Pacific Camouflage (1:50 Scale)
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The Ordnance QF 6-pounder 7 cwt, or just 6 pdr, was a British 57 mm gun, their primary anti-tank gun during the middle of World War II, as well as the main armament for a number of armoured fighting vehicles. The M33 prime mover is a modification of the US Tank Recovery Vehicle M31 which has a riveted hull. The turret, turret ring, and boom assembly, as well as certain other parts peculiar to the tank recovery vehicle, were removed, as were the .30 caliber bow and turret machine guns and the .30 caliber machine gun tripod mount. By all accounts, the M4 Sherman medium tank was regarded as the workhorse of the US Army during World War II. In fact, virtually all of the Allied armies employed the Sherman in their armed forces, including the British, who developed an upgunned variant called the "Firefly". Eleven different US plants manufactured six basic models of the Sherman, and by June 1944 over 49,234 battle-ready vehicles had been produced.
US M10 Wolverine Tank Destroyer US M31 Lee Armored Recovery Vehicle US Army GMC Truck with M2 32-Ton Treadway Bridge
US M10 Wolverine Tank Destroyer (1:50 Scale)
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US M31 Lee Armored Recovery Vehicle (1:50 Scale)
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US Army GMC Truck with M2 32-Ton Treadway Bridge (1:50 Scale)
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During World War II, American doctrine called for tank destroyers to engage enemy tanks while tanks were used principally to support the infantry. The M10 "Wolverine" used a Sherman tank hull with a special open-topped turret that carried a 3-inch gun. The gun fired the AP M79 armour-piercing shell that could cut through 4 inches of armor at a range of 1,000 yards. The back of the turret carried a large counterweight which gave it a distinctive shape. The M31 series recovery vehicle was based on the M3 series of medium tanks and were used to recover disabled tanks from the battlefield. A simulated turret was retained complete with a dummy 75mm gun to give it the appearance of an actual battle tank. In reality, the M31 recovery vehicle was armed with a single .30-caliber machine gun mounted in the bow and one on the turret for anti-aircraft purposes. During late March of 1945, the US Third Army under Gen. Patton, began its famous bridging and crossing operations of the Rhine. After the completion of the Battle in The Ardennes, Patton and his Army turned to the south and east attacking toward the Rhine.
US M4A1 Sherman Dozer Tank US M26 Pershing Heavy Tank - Summer Camouflage US M4A3E2 Sherman Jumbo Medium Tank
US M4A1 Sherman Dozer Tank (1:50 Scale)
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US M26 Pershing Heavy Tank - Summer Camouflage (1:50 Scale)
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US M4A3E2 Sherman 'Jumbo' Medium Tank (1:50 Scale)
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American soldiers needed a way to overcome the difficulties of tactical mobility and communication in order to defeat the Germans nesting in the Norman bocage. The bocage's hedgerows did not permit Sherman tanks to maneuver or penetrate the German defenses, and this was a huge problem for Allied forces. Early in June 1944, Army commanders expressed a need for a new breed of tank that could mount either a 90mm or 105mm main gun. This request was approved by the Army Staff soon thereafter even though trials of the new T26E1 had already begun back at Fort Knox earlier that year. By all accounts, the M4 Sherman medium tank was regarded as the workhorse of the US Army during World War II. In fact, virtually all of the Allied armies employed the Sherman in their armed forces, including the British, who developed an upgunned variant called the "Firefly". Eleven different US plants manufactured six basic models of the Sherman, and by June 1944 over 49,234 battle-ready vehicles had been produced.
US M5A1 Stuart Light Tank US M18 Hellcat Light Tank Destroyer - Summer Camouflage US 32-Ton Floating Treadway Bridge Used During the Crossing of the Rhine
US M5A1 Stuart Light Tank (1:50 Scale)
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US M18 Hellcat Light Tank Destroyer - Summer Camouflage (1:50 Scale)
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US 32-Ton Floating Treadway Bridge Used During the Crossing of the Rhine (1:50 Scale)
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The M5 Stuart light tank made its debut in the invasion of Casablanca in French North Africa. By 1943, and at the time of the invasion of Sicily, the upgraded M5A1 was becoming the standard light tank of the American armored divisions. Because of limited firepower, the M5A1 eventually took on reconnaissance and escort duties in Italy and, after the invasion of Normandy, throughout Europe. The M18 first saw combat in northwest Europe and Italy during the summer of 1944. It excelled at ambush and hit-and-run tactics. Its low silhouette, high firepower and great speed gave it the capability of destroying all but the heaviest of German armor, although it was too lightly armored to stand and fight. The Central Europe Campaign is the name given by the Allied Forces in World War II to the military operations conducted in central Europe from March 22nd to May 11th, 1945. It led to the surrender of Germany.
US Army Chevrolet G-7113 Truck Cab with 3-1/2 Ton Trailer US T1E3 Aunt Jemima Sherman Medium Tank with Mine Roller USMC LVTA-4 Amtank with 75mm Howitzer
US Army Chevrolet G-7113 Truck Cab with 3-1/2 Ton Trailer (1:50 Scale)
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US T1E3 "Aunt Jemima" Sherman Medium Tank with Mine Roller (1:50 Scale)
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USMC LVTA-4 Amtank with 75mm Howitzer (1:50 Scale)
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US Army Chevrolet G-7113 Truck Cab with 3-1/2 Ton Trailer One of the many hazards faced by both man and machine in WWII was the landmine. Various means were designed to counter it, and while none were more effective than clearing an area by sheer manpower, there were some mechanical devices designed to be fitted to the front of tanks that came into being. Both the Marine Corps and the Army operated two types of amphibious tracked vehicles during WWII. One was the amphibious tractor, also called an amtrac or LVT. The other was the amtank or LVTA (Landing Vehicle Tracked Armored). Though tracked amphibs were no doubt important in the European Theater of Operations, there was a special need for them in the Pacific, due principally to the nature of the terrain.
US M12 GMC 155mm Self-Propelled Artillery US M24 Chaffee Light Tank - Summer Camouflage USMC LVTA-1 Amtank with 37mm Howitzer
US M12 GMC 155mm Self-Propelled Artillery (1:50 Scale)
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US M24 Chaffee Light Tank - Summer Camouflage (1:50 Scale)
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USMC LVTA-1 Amtank with 37mm Howitzer (1:50 Scale)
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The M12 GMC was one of the first self-propelled weapons of WWII in the US arsenal. Essentially, the M12 mounted a WWI-era 155mm gun on an M3 tank chassis. The engine was moved forward to provide a working space at the rear of the hull. It was in this space that a WWI Model M1917 or M1918 155mm gun was mounted. The M24 Chaffee - arguably the best light tank of World War II - was a fast, lightly armored vehicle with the ability to deliver relatively large caliber direct fire thanks to its excellent 75 mm M6 gun. More than 4,000 vehicles were produced by Cadillac and Massey-Harris from 1943-45. The first vehicles reached Europe in late 1944, where they proved very effective and highly reliable. Both the Marine Corps and the Army operated two types of amphibious tracked vehicles during WWII. One was the amphibious tractor, also called an amtrac or LVT. The other was the amtank or LVTA (Landing Vehicle Tracked Armored).
USMC LVTA-2 Buffalo Amtank US Landing Craft Mechanized US Landing Craft Vehicles and Personnel
USMC LVTA-2 "Buffalo" Amtank (1:50 Scale)
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US Landing Craft Mechanized (1:50 Scale)
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US Landing Craft Vehicles and Personnel (1:50 Scale)
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Both the Marine Corps and the Army operated two types of amphibious tracked vehicles during WWII. One was the amphibious tractor, also called an amtrac or LVT. The other was the amtank or LVTA (Landing Vehicle Tracked Armored). Though tracked amphibs were no doubt important in the European Theater of Operations, there was a special need for them in the Pacific, due principally to the nature of the terrain. In the 1930s the U.S. Marine Corps and Navy, anticipating the need for amphibious assaults, experimented with small landing boats. Private firms were contracted to develop boats based on criteria outlined by the Navy. Officially designated as a Landing Craft, Vehicles and Personnel (LCVP), this small craft was more commonly known by the name of its inventor, New Orleans businessman Andrew Jackson Higgins. A modification of Higgins' Eureka workboat, the LCVP was highly maneuverable and ideal for landing troops on beaches.
   
 
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