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Gaso.Line British Military Vehicles

Gaso.Line British Military Vehicles


Gaso.Line has developed an extensive line of diecast and resin military vehicles that, in many instances, marries a chassis from the Solido/Verem line with specially designed resin parts produced by Gaso.Line. All of the vehicles you see here are produced in limited runs, sometimes numbering only a few dozen pieces, making them valuable additions to any military enthusiast's collection. These vehicles are built and imported directly from France, making them hard to come by in the North American marketplace.
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British Dingo Scout Car - Green British Dingo Scout Car - Desert Sand White M3A1 Scout Car in British Livery
British Dingo Scout Car - Green (1:50 Scale)
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British Dingo Scout Car - Desert Sand (1:50 Scale)
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White M3A1 Scout Car in British Livery (1:50 Scale)
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In 1938, Britian's  Mechanisation Board had Alvis Limited, BSA Cycles Limited, and Morris Commercial Cars Limited submit prototypes for a turretless scouting vehicle. The Daimler version was designed as a fast reconnaissance and liaison vehicle so out of the three designs submitted the one from BSA's (Daimler's owner) was selected. The Dingo featured a front wheel drive, sliding roof over the crew, and a potbelly cab. In 1938, Britian's  Mechanisation Board had Alvis Limited, BSA Cycles Limited, and Morris Commercial Cars Limited submit prototypes for a turretless scouting vehicle. The Daimler version was designed as a fast reconnaissance and liaison vehicle so out of the three designs submitted the one from BSA's (Daimler's owner) was selected. The Dingo featured a front wheel drive, sliding roof over the crew, and a potbelly cab. As military vehicles go, the White M3A1 scout car was relatively short-lived during the war. First produced in 1938, it was basically obsolete as a frontline vehicle after the North African campaign because of its limited seating capacity. Initially, the scout car was primarily used by armored and reconnaissance units, but it was more suited to road use than cross-country terrain, so the larger and more robust half-track was developed.
British T17E1 Staghound Armored Car British Universal Mk. II Bren Gun Carrier - Green British Universal Mk. II Bren Gun Carrier - Desert Camouflage
British T17E1 "Staghound" Armored Car (1:50 Scale)
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British Universal Mk. II Bren Gun Carrier - Green (1:50 Scale)
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British Universal Mk. II Bren Gun Carrier - Desert Camouflage (1:50 Scale)
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In July 1941, after the British experience in North Africa, the US Ordnance Committee gave design specifications for a medium and heavy armored car. Ford developed a 6-wheeled pilot model and Chevrolet a 4-wheeled model in September 1941. On October 15th, 1942, a committee was formed from Armored Force, Cavalry, Tank Destroyer, and Ordnance personnel to consider the armored cars in design or production. The original role envisaged for the Universal Carrier was for a fast, lightly armed vehicle to carry infantry across ground denied by small-arms fire and specifically, the Bren light machine gun and its team, hence the name Bren Gun Carrier. The original role envisaged for the Universal Carrier was for a fast, lightly armed vehicle to carry infantry across ground denied by small-arms fire and specifically, the Bren light machine gun and its team, hence the name Bren Gun Carrier.
British Bren WASP Mk.II Flame-Thrower Tank British Sherman Beach Armored Recovery Vehicle (BARV) British Sexton 25 Pounder Self-Propelled Gun
British Bren WASP Mk.II Flame-Thrower Tank (1:50 Scale)
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British Sherman Beach Armored Recovery Vehicle (BARV) (1:50 Scale)
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British Sexton 25 Pounder Self-Propelled Gun (1:50 Scale)
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The original role envisaged for the Universal Carrier was for a fast, lightly armed vehicle to carry infantry across ground denied by small-arms fire and specifically, the Bren light machine gun and its team, hence the name Bren Gun Carrier. The practice of waterproofing vehicles had contributed to the success of earlier amphibious operations. When landing across open beaches it was necessary to keep the flow of traffic moving to allow speedy disembarkment from landing craft and the crafts swift removal from the area of operation. This enabled the fighting units to become operational on land quickly and maintain the momentum of the assault. In 1941, the British were searching for a suitable armored vehicle to mount the standard British 25-pounder gun. The Canadians were producing the Ram tank, soon to be replaced by American M3s, and these were altered to accommodate the 25-pounder, becoming known as the Sexton.
British M4 Sherman Firefly Medium Tank British Matilda Mk. II Infantry Tank British Churchill ARK I Armored Ramp Carrier
British M4 Sherman Firefly Medium Tank (1:50 Scale)
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British Matilda Mk. II Infantry Tank (1:50 Scale)
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British Churchill ARK I Armored Ramp Carrier (1:50 Scale)
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The Sherman Firefly was a British variation of the M4 Sherman tank, fitted with the more powerful 17 pounder main gun. The nickname Firefly quickly became synonymous with any M4 Sherman fitted with this gun, and while plans were devised to modify the Sherman IV, only the Sherman I and V were used in the end. The Matilda Mark I was developed in response to a 1934 requirement for a close-support infantry tank. Well armored for its day, it was, nevertheless, a small, simple tank. Despite being sturdy enough to withstand hits from most German tank guns in the early stages of WWII, it was too poorly armed to be of much use as the war progressed. The British Army produced its first bridging tank at the end of World War I and experimented throughout the inter-war period, seeing the need to have vehicles to facilitate the crossing of obstacles. The first Armoured Ramp Carrier, the ARK Mk. I, appeared in 1943. This was a converted Churchill tank with the turret removed and a blanking plate welded over the aperture and timbered trackways across the top.
British Churchill AVRE Tank with 290mm Howitzer British Cruiser Mk. VI Crusader III Tank British Sherman Crab Tank with Mine Flail
British Churchill AVRE Tank with 290mm Howitzer (1:50 Scale)
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British Cruiser Mk. VI Crusader III Tank (1:50 Scale)
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British Sherman Crab Tank with Mine Flail (1:50 Scale)
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The Churchill Assault Vehicle Royal Engineers (AVRE) was born out of the failure  of the 1942 Dieppe raid where engineers were prevented from clearing obstacles by enemy fire. The tank was developed by a Canadian engineer, Lieutenant Denovan, and created to transport engineers to a required spot while affording protection, as well as carrying a heavy demolitions weapon (Special fittings were placed on the sides at the front for attaching devices). The Crusader's attractive design belied the fact that by the time it first appeared in 1941 it was already outdated. Fast and mobile (their suspensfion was so tough that theoretical maximum speed was often exceeded), they were thinly armored and lacked firepower, being no match for their German counterparts. Reliability was also a problem. Invented by a South African, the concept of using flails to clear mines was developed in the UK culminating in the creation of the Crab, which was usually fitted to Sherman tanks. Some 43 chains were mounted on a revolving drum powered by the main tank engine. Further developments included the addition of barbed wire-cutting disks and a contour following device to allow the flails to operate effectively over rough ground.
British Achilles Tank Destroyer British Light Mk VII, Tetrarch I Airborne Tank British M3A3 Stuart Honey Light Tank - 7th Armoured Division (Desert Rats), North Africa, 1941
British Achilles Tank Destroyer (1:50 Scale)
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British Light Mk VII, Tetrarch I Airborne Tank (1:50 Scale)
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British M3A3 Stuart 'Honey' Light Tank - 7th Armoured Division ("Desert Rats"), North Africa, 1941 (1:50 Scale)
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By 1944, a number of the "basic" Shermans in British use were being converted to Sherman Fireflies. This was achieved by adding the potent QF 17 pounder gun to a lone vehicle — giving each platoon of Shermans a dedicated tank destroyer. The 17 pounder was also used to equip the US supplied M10 Wolverine, which became known as the "Achilles", not to mention creating the Archer from the Valentine tank. The Tetrarch tank was originally designed as a replacement for the Light Tank Mk VI. Like its predecessor it was built and designed by Vickers Armstrong, with design work starting in 1937. On completion it went into trials in 1938 and was accepted into service with the British army, but not immediately into the light tank role. The M3A3, or Stuart V, was modified to have a sloped hull similar to the light tank M5 Stuart. M3A3 was also fitted with a new turret incorporating a radio bustle and larger hatches. The new hull armor gave the drivers their own hatches (previously the assistant driver had to exit through the turret), and eliminated the drivers' doors in the front hull.
British Churchill Crocodile Flame Throwing Tank British Centaur Mk. II Tank with Anti-Aircraft Gun
British Churchill Crocodile Flame Throwing Tank (1:50 Scale)
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British Centaur Mk. II Tank with Anti-Aircraft Gun (1:50 Scale)
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The Churchill Crocodile was a British flame-throwing tank of late World War II, it was a variant of the Tank, Infantry, Mk VI (A22) Churchill VII, although the Churchill IV was initially chosen to be the base vehicle. Eight hundred were built. The Centaur Mk. I entered production in the autumn of 1942, and was armed with the 6-pounder gun. This was followed by the Mk. III with a 75mm gun and Mk. IV which mounted a 95mm howitzer. Early in 1943 most Centaur Mk. Is were converted to Mk. IIIs by changing the armament.
   
 
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