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  Brazilian M8 Light Armored Car - First Brazilian Expeditionary Force, Italy, 1944 (1:72 Scale)
Brazilian M8 Light Armored Car - First Brazilian Expeditionary Force, Italy, 1944

Hobby Master Brazilian M8 Light Armored Car - First Brazilian Expeditionary Force, Italy, 1944




 
List Price: $23.99
Our Price: $21.99 Sold Out!
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Stock Status: (Out of Stock)

Availability: Currently Unavailable
Product Code: HG3808

Description Extended Information
 
Hobby Master HG3808 Brazilian M8 Light Armored Car - First Brazilian Expeditionary Force, Italy, 1944 (1:72 Scale) "Cobras Fumantes ('Smoking Snakes')."
- Term used by the Brazilian soldiers to describe their participation in WWII

The M8 Light Armored Car was a 6x6 armored car produced by the Ford Motor Company during the Second World War. It was used by the U.S. and British troops in Europe and the Far East until the end of the war. The vehicle was widely exported and as of 2006 still remains in service in some third world countries. In British service the M8 was known as Greyhound.

In July 1941, the Ordnance department initiated a development of a new fast tank destroyer to replace the M6 37 mm Gun Motor Carriage, which was essentially a 3/4 ton truck with a 37 mm gun installed in the rear bed. The requirement was for a 6x4 wheeled vehicle armed with a 37 mm gun and a coaxial machine gun mounted in a turret. Its glacis armor was supposed to withstand a .50 cal. machine gun fire and side armor a .30 cal. machine gun fire. Prototypes were submitted by Studebaker (T21), Ford (T22) and Chrysler (T23), all of them similar in design and appearance. In April 1942 a modified version of the T22 was selected. By then it was clear that the 37 mm gun would not be effective against the front armour of German tanks so the new armored car, designated M8 Light Armored Car and named Greyhound by the British due to its high speed but thin armor, took on reconnaissance role instead. Contract issues and minor design improvements delayed serial production until March 1943. Production ended in June 1945. A total of 8,523 units were built, not including the M20 Armored Utility Car.

This particular 1:72 scale M8 light armored car was attached to the Brazilian Army, then deployed to Italy during 1944. Sold Out!

Dimensions:
Length: 2.66 inches
Width: 1.25 inches

Release Date: February 2010

Historical Account: "A Long Way From Rio" - The Brazilian Expeditionary Force or BEF (Portuguese: Forsa Expedicionaria Brasileira, or FEB) was a 25,300-man force that the Brazilian Navy, Army and Air Force formed to fight alongside the Allied forces in World War II. Brazil was the only South American country to send troops to fight in the war.

The Brazilian Army and Air Force fought in Italy and the Navy in the Atlantic Ocean. During the eight months of the Italian campaign, the Brazilian Expeditionary Force managed to take 20,573 Axis prisoners, including two generals, 892 officers and 19,679 other ranks. During the War, Brazil lost 948 of its own men killed in action across all three services.

Features
  • Diecast metal and plastic construction
  • Rotating turret
  • Elevating gun
  • Accurate markings and insignia

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